MLD for Lymphedema

Manual Lymph Drainage Water Drop

LYMPHEDEMA

Lymphedema may be acute or chronic. Acute lymphedema results after a sprain, strain, bruise, surgery, or other physical trauma. Because the lymph system helps the body recover from trauma, the amount of injury related swelling or bruising can create a “back-up” in the lymph system. This slows down the drainage of connective tissue. Applying MLD improves motility of the congested lymph vessels and encourages uptake of waste products for delivery to the nodes. As the swelling recedes, the cells come closer to their source of nourishment, thereby promoting healing. This process can reduce recovery time.

Chronic lymphedema may be primary or secondary. Primary lymphedema occurs when a person is born with a deficit in his or her lymph system. Secondary lymphedema may occur after an injury, trauma, surgery, infection, or radiation, where the lymph vessels or nodes are removed, interrupted, or damaged. In either case, chronic lymphedema does not reduce by itself and elevation no longer helps. Because of the pumping and stretching of the skin through the MLD technique, the lymph vessels are encouraged to take up fluid from the connective tissue, thus reducing lymphedema. Chronic lymphedema cannot be cured but can be successfully managed so that you can live your daily life.

Physical Therapy Treatment for Lymphedema consists of Combined Decongestive Therapy. Depending on the results of the physical therapy evaluation, treatment may include client education, soft tissue correction, scar management, therapeutic exercise, manual lymph drainage, compression bandaging, skin care, and compression garments. A home program, with your goals in mind, will be established for ongoing self-care of your lymphedema.

See https://vodderschool.com/lymphedema

Manual Lymph Drainage Massage for maintenance is available after Physical Therapy discharge.

Manual Lymph Drainage Section Divider

MLD for Lymphatic Conditions

LYMPHEDEMA

Lymphedema may be acute or chronic. Acute lymphedema results after a sprain, strain, bruise, surgery, or other physical trauma. Because the lymph system helps the body recover from trauma, the amount of injury related swelling or bruising can create a “back-up” in the lymph system. This slows down the drainage of connective tissue. Applying MLD improves motility of the congested lymph vessels and encourages uptake of waste products for delivery to the nodes. As the swelling recedes, the cells come closer to their source of nourishment, thereby promoting healing. This process can reduce recovery time.

Chronic lymphedema may be primary or secondary. Primary lymphedema occurs when a person is born with a deficit in his or her lymph system. Secondary lymphedema may occur after an injury, trauma, surgery, infection, or radiation, where the lymph vessels or nodes are removed, interrupted, or damaged. In either case, chronic lymphedema does not reduce by itself and elevation no longer helps. Because of the pumping and stretching of the skin through the MLD technique, the lymph vessels are encouraged to take up fluid from the connective tissue, thus reducing lymphedema. Chronic lymphedema cannot be cured but can be successfully managed so that you can live your daily life.

Physical Therapy Treatment for Lymphedema consists of Combined Decongestive Therapy. Depending on the results of the physical therapy evaluation, treatment may include client education, soft tissue correction, scar management, therapeutic exercise, manual lymph drainage, compression bandaging, skin care, and compression garments. A home program, with your goals in mind, will be established for ongoing self-care of your lymphedema.

See https://vodderschool.com/lymphedema

Manual Lymph Drainage Massage for maintenance is available after Physical Therapy discharge.

Manual Lymph Drainage Section Divider