MLD for Lymphatic Conditions

Manual Lymph Drainage Water Drop

LYMPHEDEMA

Lymphedema may be acute or chronic. Acute lymphedema results after a sprain, strain, bruise, surgery, or other physical trauma. Because the lymph system helps the body recover from trauma, the amount of injury related swelling or bruising can create a “back-up” in the lymph system. This slows down the drainage of connective tissue. Applying MLD improves motility of the congested lymph vessels and encourages uptake of waste products for delivery to the nodes. As the swelling recedes, the cells come closer to their source of nourishment, thereby promoting healing. This process can reduce recovery time.

Chronic lymphedema may be primary or secondary. Primary lymphedema occurs when a person is born with a deficit in his or her lymph system. Secondary lymphedema may occur after an injury, trauma, surgery, infection, or radiation, where the lymph vessels or nodes are removed, interrupted, or damaged. In either case, chronic lymphedema does not reduce by itself and elevation no longer helps. Because of the pumping and stretching of the skin through the MLD technique, the lymph vessels are encouraged to take up fluid from the connective tissue, thus reducing lymphedema. Chronic lymphedema cannot be cured. It can only be managed through manual stimulation of lymphatics, use of compression, good skin care, and exercise.  

LIPEDEMA

Lipedema is a condition where fat cells are over-inflated and painful. The enlarged fat cells look like cellulite under the skin. It mostly affects women, and there is a hereditary component in 50% of the cases. Often, there are visible spider veins under the skin owing to the elongated and perforated superficial capillaries. The skin can also bruise easily as the tissues under the skin can tear. The fat cells tend to enlarge on the lower abdomen, buttocks, hips, and legs, with the feet unaffected. There is a “cuff” of fat around the ankle as if there were a band stopping it from going into the feet. In some cases, both the arms and the legs can be affected with the upper torso remaining normal size. In 10% of cases, only the arms are affected. The hands, like the feet, tend not to be affected, but as the condition progresses, the feet and hands can eventually swell.

The enlarged fat cells do not have a good supply of lymphatics to siphon off the excess fluid. Manual Lymph Drainage (MLD) helps to move the excess water from the fat cells toward lymph vessels. This encourages drainage of the connective tissue.

Manual Lymph Drainage Section Divider

MLD for Lymphatic Conditions

LYMPHEDEMA

Lymphedema may be acute or chronic. Acute lymphedema results after a sprain, strain, bruise, surgery, or other physical trauma. Because the lymph system helps the body recover from trauma, the amount of injury related swelling or bruising can create a “back-up” in the lymph system. This slows down the drainage of connective tissue. Applying MLD improves motility of the congested lymph vessels and encourages uptake of waste products for delivery to the nodes. As the swelling recedes, the cells come closer to their source of nourishment, thereby promoting healing. This process can reduce recovery time.

Chronic lymphedema may be primary or secondary. Primary lymphedema occurs when a person is born with a deficit in his or her lymph system. Secondary lymphedema may occur after an injury, trauma, surgery, infection, or radiation, where the lymph vessels or nodes are removed, interrupted, or damaged. In either case, chronic lymphedema does not reduce by itself and elevation no longer helps. Because of the pumping and stretching of the skin through the MLD technique, the lymph vessels are encouraged to take up fluid from the connective tissue, thus reducing lymphedema. Chronic lymphedema cannot be cured. It can only be managed through manual stimulation of lymphatics, use of compression, good skin care, and exercise.  

LIPEDEMA

Lipedema is a condition where fat cells are over-inflated and painful. The enlarged fat cells look like cellulite under the skin. It mostly affects women, and there is a hereditary component in 50% of the cases. Often, there are visible spider veins under the skin owing to the elongated and perforated superficial capillaries. The skin can also bruise easily as the tissues under the skin can tear. The fat cells tend to enlarge on the lower abdomen, buttocks, hips, and legs, with the feet unaffected. There is a “cuff” of fat around the ankle as if there were a band stopping it from going into the feet. In some cases, both the arms and the legs can be affected with the upper torso remaining normal size. In 10% of cases, only the arms are affected. The hands, like the feet, tend not to be affected, but as the condition progresses, the feet and hands can eventually swell.

The enlarged fat cells do not have a good supply of lymphatics to siphon off the excess fluid. Manual Lymph Drainage (MLD) helps to move the excess water from the fat cells toward lymph vessels. This encourages drainage of the connective tissue.

 

Manual Lymph Drainage Section Divider